Colorado Vacations 
Family Travel Colorado 
Your Guide to Visiting Colorado with the Kids
Transportation for Your Family Vacation in Colorado

Getting Around Colorado 

Colorado vacations with the kids more often than not involve traveling vast distances.

Major options including flying, a rental car, and riding a train. 

Getting to your destination and getting around once you are there takes planning and forethought. 

Use our questions to help  plan your transportation on your family vacation in Colorado. 



Di
d You Know?

Colorado has 41 passes over 10,000 feet above sea level.

Many can be traveled by passenger car, though some can only be accessed by 4-wheel drive vehicles.

Vail Pass offers great views of the Gore Range in Colorado
Families on vacation in
Colorado can travel right over
10,662-foot Vail Pass on I-70.  




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Photo: Kids Explore Mesa Verde National Park
Article: Mesa Verde National Park








Photo: Rocky Mountain National Park Visitor Shuttle



With 104,094 square miles, Colorado is the eighth largest state in the Union. Wherever you plan to go, and especially if you are vacationing with kids, getting there is as much a part of the experience as being there. Not that the getting there is so bad, what with beautiful views to see, and great attractions along the way. It’s just that in Colorado, places can be a long way apart.

When you travel in Colorado, transportation is a major aspect of the trip. Families visiting the Centennial State have few options:

Drive
Fly
Take a Train

Tourist travel in Colorado began before cars were invented, but just barely. It’s population and vacation sites developed during the automobile’s heyday. So with a few notable exceptions, most families who travel in Colorado will at some point find that a car comes in handy.

Once you get to your destination by either driving, flying, or riding the train, you will be able to get around by driving, and maybe on public transportation, bicycle, or foot. River running, mountain biking, and hiking, are most frequently activities to be pursued after you arrive.

Driving your own car generally takes longer than flying, and may or may not be less expensive, factoring in gas prices, lodging, meals, and time spent on the road. Another option may be to buy or rent an RV and spend the miles in more space and comfort, but burning more fuel along the way. With such vast distances to cover, flying and renting a car may make the most sense for your family.

Whatever form of transportation you choose, consider the following factors while planning your trip:

•    How much time do we have for our vacation?
•    What is our budget?
•    Do we want to spend our time at the destination, or is the journey just as important?
•    How many destinations would we like to visit on this trip?
•    How close together are the points of interest?
•    How available is alternative transportation once we get there?
•    How old are our kids, and how many kids do we have?
•    How much tolerance does our family have for hassle?
•    How much control do we want to have over our schedule?
•    Will we be bringing our own equipment (skis, pool toys, camping equipment) or renting it after we get there?
•    Do we want to camp or stay in hotels or other lodging?
•    Do we want to picnic or eat in restaurants or both?
•    How does our family like to get around?